Seasonal banding overviews

Fall 2014 (truncated season)

  • 18 Aug to 30 Oct (17 days)
  • Average 3.7 hours per day with average 11.5 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 248 new birds, 25 recaps, 317 birds netted –capture rate of 50.6 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 44 species, plus 2 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird,  House Sparrow)

More details on fall 2014

Fall 2013

  • 15 Aug to 5 Nov (29 days)
  • Average 4.6 hours per day with average 15 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 550 new birds, 87 recaps, 741 birds netted –capture rate of 39.4 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 56 species, plus 2 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird,  House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    1. American Robin — 118 (low; previous mean 189.7)
    2. White-throated Sparrow –49
    3. Common Grackle — 35 (new high; previous mean 8.8)
    4. Song Sparrow — 33 (new record low; previous mean 55.3)
    5. Gray Catbird — 32 (same as last year, which was record low)
    6. Yellow-rumped Warbler — 28
    7. Hermit Thrush — 21
    8. Cedar Waxwing –19
    9. Nashville Warbler — 16
    10. Ruby-crowned Kinglet — 15

More details on fall 2013

Fall 2012

  • 17 Aug to 25 Oct (38 days)
  • Average 4.3 hours per day with average 17 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 616 new birds, 72 recaps, 725 birds netted –capture rate of 25.7 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 60 species, plus 2 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird,  House Sparrow) and one recaptured only (Downy Woodpecker)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • American Robin — 107 (low; previous mean 188)
    • Song Sparrow — 37
    • Blackpoll Warbler — 36
    • Gray Catbird — 32 (new record low; previous mean 138)
    • American Goldfinch — 32
    • Swainson’s Thrush — 30 (low)
    • Magnolia Warbler — 27
    • Hermit Thrush and American Redstart — 26
    • White-crowned Sparrow — 21

More details on fall 2012

Fall 2011

  • 12 Aug to 8 Nov (56 days)
  • Average 4.6 hours per day with average 17 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1227 new birds, 174 recaps, 1533 birds netted –capture rate of 35.7 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 76 species, plus 2 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird [57],  House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • American Robin — 255 (sixth best fall season)
    • Nashville Warbler — 82 (new record high)
    • Gray Catbird— 57 (new record low)
    • Hermit Thrush — 56
    • White-throated Sparrow — 54
    • Song Sparrow — 44
    • Blackpoll Warbler and Magnolia Warbler — 51
    • Song Sparrow — 49
    • American Goldfinch — 39 (7th lowest fall season)
    • American Redstart — 34
    • Yellow-rumped Warbler — 30

More details on fall 2011

Fall 2010

  • 16 Aug to 31 Oct (54 days)
  • Average 4.5 hours per day with average 18 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1116 new birds, 200 recaps, 1394 birds netted –capture rate of 34.8 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 72 species, plus 2 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird [44],  House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • American Robin — 196
    • Gray Catbird — 93
    • American Goldfinch — 78
    • White-throated Sparrow — 55
    • Swainson’s Thrush — 49
    • Song Sparrow — 44
    • Hermit Thrush, Nashville Warbler, and Blackpoll Warbler — 38 each
    • Magnolia Warbler — 35
    • Golden-crowned Kinglet — 34
    • American Redstart — 27

More details on fall 2010

Fall 2009

  • 17 Aug to 8 Nov (57 days)
  • Average 4.5 hours per day with average 16.5 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1169 new birds, 158 recaps, 1484 birds netted –capture rate of 37.6 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 63 species, plus 3 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird [50],  European Starling, House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • American Robin — 391 (record high)
    • American Goldfinch — 84
    • Gray Catbird — 76 (record low)
    • Song Sparrow — 53
    • Dark-eyed Junco — 39
    • Nashville Warbler — 35
    • Northern Cardinal — 31
    • Hermit Thrush — 27
    • White-throated Sparrow — 27 (record low)
    • Swainson’s Thrush — 24

More details on fall 2009

Spring 2009

Only minimal banding done, but daily surveys were conducted. A summary of spring 2009 surveys can be found here.

Fall 2008

  • 19 Aug to 5 Nov (48 days)
  • Average 4.8 hours per day with average 15.5 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 842 new birds, 223 recaps, 1140 birds netted — capture rate of 33.4 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 62 species, plus 1 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • American Robin — 110
    • Gray Catbird — 109
    • White-throated Sparrow — 67
    • Hermit Thrush — 64
    • Song Sparrow  — 44

More details on fall 2008

Spring 2008

Only minimal banding done. A summary of spring 2008 surveys can be found here.

Fall 2007

  • 21 Aug to 3 Nov (43 days)
  • Average 4.75 hours per day with average 16.5 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1230 new birds, 163 recaps, 1499 birds netted — capture rate of 46.7 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 66 species, plus 3 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow, European Starling)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • American Goldfinch — 283
    • American Robin — 215
    • Gray Catbird — 104
    • Nashville Warbler  — 44
    • Song Sparrow — 43

More details on fall 2007

Spring 2007

  • 20 Apr to 29 May (19 days)
  • Average 4.2 hours per day with average 17 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 373 new birds, 72 recaps, 473 birds netted — capture rate of 34.3 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 56 species, plus 2 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird, European Starling)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • American Goldfinch — 39
    • White-crowned Sparrow — 35
    • Gray Catbird — 34
    • White-throated Sparrow — 30
    • Nashville Warbler — 19
    • Lincoln’s Sparrow — 15

Fall 2006

  • 15 Aug to 5 Nov (44 days)
  • Average 4.4 hours per day with average 16 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1231 new birds, 262 recaps, 1597 birds netted — capture rate of 55.1 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 73 species, plus 3 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow, European Starling)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • Gray Catbird — 148
    • American Robin — 138
    • Magnolia Warbler — 63 (new record)
    • Nashville Warbler — 59 (new record)
    • Song Sparrow — 50
    • White-throated Sparrow — 49

More details on Fall 2006

Spring 2006

  • 17 Apr to 29 May (24 days)
  • Average 4.5 hours per day with average 17 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 385 new birds, 59 recaps, 461 birds netted — capture rate of 25.8 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 52 species, plus 1 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • White-crowned Sparrow — 54 (new record)
    • White-throated Sparrow — 36
    • American Goldfinch — 24
    • Ruby-crowned Kinglet — 22 (new record)
    • Gray Catbird — 22
    • Swamp Sparrow — 19

More details on Spring 2006

Fall 2005

  • 17 Aug to 5 Nov (51 days)
  • Average 4.2 hours per day with average 17 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1626 new birds, 278 recaps, 1959 birds netted — capture rate of 55.9 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 69 species, plus 3 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird, European Starling,  House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • American Robin — 353 (new record)
    • American Goldfinch — 247 (new record)
    • Gray Catbird — 155
    • White-throated Sparrow — 113
    • Song Sparrow — 57

More details on Fall 2005

Spring 2005

  • 15 Apr to 29 May (26 days)
  • Average 4.6 hours per day with average 17 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 366 new birds, 70 recaps, 462 birds netted — capture rate of 23 birds per 100 net-hours (second lowest capture rate)
  • 58 species, plus 2 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow)
  • Two new species!  Grasshopper Sparrow and Northern Mockingbird
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • White-throated Sparrow — 35
    • Gray Catbird — 30
    • American Goldfinch — 24
    • White-crowned Sparrow — 18
    • Nashville Warbler — 17

More details on Spring 2005

Fall 2004

  • 16 Aug to 1 Nov (46 days)
  • Average 4.6 hours per day with average 16.6 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1028 new birds, 206 recaps, 1289 birds netted — capture rate of 32.7 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 67 species, plus 3 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird, European Starling, House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • American Robin — 142
    • Gray Catbird — 134
    • American Goldfinch — 116
    • Magnolia Warbler — 52
    • Song Sparrow — 46

More details on Fall 2004

Spring 2004

  • 15 Apr to 3 Jun (31 days)
  • Average 5.4 hours per day with average 18 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 639 new birds, 113 recaps, 788 birds netted; capture rate of 31.3 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 64 species, plus 2 released unbanded (Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (does not include recaptures):
    • Gray Catbird — 57
    • White-throated Sparrow — 39
    • Lincoln’s Sparrow — 33
    • Swamp Sparrow — 30
    • Common Yellowthroat — 28

More details on Spring 2004

Fall 2003

  • 18 August to 8 Nov (53 days)
  • Average 5 hours per day with average 18 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1911 new birds, 515 recaps, 2605 birds netted — all new highs; capture rate of 57.1 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 74 species including our first “Yellow”Palm Warbler, plus 3 released unbanded (European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird [23 netted], House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (includes recaptures):
    • American Robin — 369
    • Gray Catbird — 272
    • Hermit Thrush — 227
    • American Goldfinch — 179

More details on Fall 2003

Spring 2003

  • 14 April to 8 Jun (37 days)
  • Average 5 hours per day with average 20 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 831 new birds, 179  recaps, 1090 birds netted, 30.0 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 67 species, plus 3 released unbanded (European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (includes recaptures):
    • White-throated Sparrow — 113
    • Gray Catbird — 109
    • American Goldfinch — 66
    • Common Yellowthroat — 50
    • Lincoln’s Sparrow — 46
    • Nashville Warbler — 40
    • Swamp Sparrow — 37
    • Wilson’s Warbler — 32

More details on spring 2003

Fall 2002

  • 15 August to 4 November (48 days; 9 days lost to weather)
  • Average 4.25 hours per day with average 18 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 910  new birds, 215recaps, 1199 birds netted, 32.4 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 64 species, plus 3 released unbanded (European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (includes recaps):
    • Gray Catbird — 158
    • American Robin — 129
    • Swainson’s Thrush — 71
    • White-throated Sparrow — 61
    • Hermit Thrush — 55
    • American Redstart — 42
    • Song Sparrow — 42
    • Ruby-crowned Kinglet — 36
    • American Goldfinch — 35
    • Yellow-rumped Warbler — 34

More details on Fall 2002

More information on Northern Saw-whet Owl banding, fall 2002

Spring 2002

  • 16 April to 31 May (31 days; 6 days lost to weather)
  • Average 5 hours per day with average 20 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 830 new birds, 218  recaps, 1137 birds netted, 36.7 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 71 species, plus 3 released unbanded (European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species (includes recaps):
    • Gray Catbird — 135
    • American Goldfinch — 123
    • White-throated Sparrow — 49
    • Black-capped Chickadee — 47
    • Yellow Warbler — 44
    • Red-winged Blackbird — 44
    • Magnolia Warbler — 38
    • Nashville Warbler — 37

More details on Spring 2002

Fall 2001

  • 15 August to 4 November (47 days)
  • Average 4.4 hours per day with average 20 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1763 new birds, 451  recaps, 2424 birds netted, 58.3 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 70 species, plus 3 released unbanded (European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species:
    • American Robin — 320
    • Yellow-rumped Warbler — 241
    • Gray Catbird — 170
    • Swainson’s Thrush — 99
    • American Goldfinch — 75

More details on Fall 2001

Spring 2001

  • 19 April to 30 May (26 days)
  • Average 4.25 hours per day with average 17 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 510 new birds, 106  recaps, 668 birds netted, 36.0 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 58 species, plus 3 released unbanded (European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species:
    • Gray Catbird — 80
    • American Goldfinch — 57
    • Nashville Warbler and Red-winged
      Blackbird — 29 each
    • White-crowned Sparrow — 27
    • Yellow Warbler — 25

More details on Spring 2001

Fall 2000

  • 14 August to 1 November (51 days)
  • Average 3.8 hours per day with average 17.5 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1526 new birds, 294  recaps, 1961 birds netted, 57.3 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 76 species, plus 3 released unbanded (European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, House Sparrow)
  • Most numerous species:
    • American Robin — 199
    • Gray Catbird — 167
    • American Goldfinch — 134
    • White-crowned Sparrow — 110
    • Swainson’s Thrush — 90

More details on Fall 2000

More information on Northern Saw-whet Owl banding, fall 2000

Spring 2000

  • 18 April to 29 May (28 days — 6 whole and 5 partial days lost to rain!)
  • Average 4.2 hours per day with average 16.5 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 589 new birds, 112 recaps, 760 birds netted, 38.8 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 61 species, plus 2 released unbanded (European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird)
  • Most numerous species:
    • American Goldfinch — 85
    • Gray Catbird — 73
    • White-crowned Sparrow — 36
    • Red-winged Blackbird — 33

More details on Spring 2000

Fall 1999

  • 15 August to 5 November (53 days)
  • Average 4 hours per day with 13 to 15 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 1496 new birds, 302 recaps, 1878 birds netted, 57.5 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 76 species, plus 3 released unbanded (House Sparrow, European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird)
  • Most numerous species:
    • American Robin — 271
    • Swainson’s Thrush — 147
    • Gray Catbird — 140
    • White-throated Sparrow — 123
    • American Goldfinch — 90

More details on Fall 1999

Information of Northern Saw-whet Owl banding, fall 1999

Spring 1999

  • 15 April to 3 June (30 days)
  • Average 4.7 hours per day with 13 to 15 nets (12 meter equivalent)
  • 685 new birds, 106 recaps, 827 birds netted, 43.8 birds per 100 net-hours
  • 66 species, plus 3 released unbanded (House Sparrow, European Starling, Ruby-throated Hummingbird).
  • Highlights were possible first state record Western Wood-Pewee, new species Common Redpoll, Pine Siskin, and Marsh Wren
  • Most numerous species:
    • Gray Catbird — 96
    • Yellow-rumped Warbler — 92
    • American Goldfinch — 40
    • Red-winged Blackbird — 37
    • Swainson’s Thrush — 27

Fall 1998

  • 17 August to 1 November (59 days)
  • 1344 new birds, 1709 birds netted, 52.8 birds per 100 net-hours, our best season ever!
  • 66 species, including Rusty Blackbird (a new species and our 10,00th bird banded), Cape May Warbler, two Winter Wrens
  • Most numerous species:
    • Swainson’s Thrush — 174
    • White-throated Sparrow — 150
    • Gray Catbird — 133 (plus 110
      recaptured)
    • American Robin — 111
    • Hermit Thrush — 101

Spring 1998

  • 15 April to 29 May (28 days)
  • 276 new birds, 391 birds netted, 27.0 birds per 100 net-hours, second slowest spring
  • 55 species, including White-eyed Vireo, Yellow-breasted Chat, Golden-winged Warbler, Blue-winged Warbler
  • Most numerous species: Gray Catbird 40, American Goldfinch 33, Red-winged Blackbird 19, Swamp Sparrow 14, and Song Sparrow 14.  Birds that always make into this list (Swainson’s Thrush, White-throated Sparrow, American Redstart, Yellow-rumped Warbler) were banded in lower than usual numbers.  (Compare our 176 yellow-rumps last year to this year’s 4!)
  • There were 17 returns from previous years, including a Wood Thrush from 1995, a Red-eyed Vireo from 1996, and 11 Gray Catbirds

Fall 1997

  • 15 August to 30 October (51 days)
  • 757 new birds, 974 birds netted, 41.0 birds per 100 net-hours, down from previous 5-year mean of 56 per 100 net-hours!
  • 60 species
  • Most numerous species: Gray Catbird (111, over 50% of which were recaptured), American Robin (97), Song Sparrow (58), Swainson’s Thrush (56), White-throated Sparrow (49), Hermit Thrush (48), American Goldfinch (38), Magnolia Warbler (35), and Yellow-rumped Warbler (31).
  • Common Nighthawk was a new species.

Spring 1997

  • 15 April to 4 June (31 days)
  • 788 new birds (topping our previous spring high of 575!), 920 birds netted, a whopping 91.5 birds per 100 net-hours! The majority were captured by the lake in 5 short nets…where our capture rate was 324 per 100 net-hours.
  • 66 species
  • Most numerous species: Yellow-rumped Warbler (174), Palm Warbler (48), Yellow Warbler (40), Gray Catbird (34), Magnolia Warbler and White-throated Sparrow (33 each).
  • Needless to say, our most spectacular spring yet.  Busiest morning was 16 May, when we netted 130 birds. Over 72% of all the birds were banded in 11 mornings between 9 and 23 May.

Fall 1996

  • 15 August to 28 October (44 days, lots of lousy weather)
  • 739 new birds, 119 recaptures, 63 birds/100 net-hours
  • 58 species
  • This was our worst fall on record, with totals down about 30%. This situation was experienced by other regional banding stations as well. Our most interesting bird was a Nashville Warbler first captured in August that was recaptured in September and October.

Spring 1996

  • 15 April to 30 May (27 days, lots of lousy weather)
  • 527 new birds, 99 recaptures, 60.9 birds/100 net-hours
  • 69 species
  • Highlights: Nothing very rare, but many bird typical of tree-tops down to net level…Solitary and Yellow-throated Vireos, Scarlet Tanagers, Black-throated Green Warblers, etc.

Fall 1995

  • 14 August to 2 November (53 days)
  • 1165 new birds, 225 recaptures, 59 birds/100 net-hours
  • 73 species
  • Highlights: 3 Red-breasted Nuthatches, 9 Philadelphia Vireos, Solitary Vireo, 102 Swainson’s Thrushes, 7 Black-throated Blue Warblers

Spring 1995

  • 14 April to 2 June (35 days)
  • 554 new birds, 104 recaptures, 34 birds/100 net-hours
  • 70 species
  • Highlights: Black-billed Cuckoo, a Hairy Woodpecker banded here 13 years ago!, three Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Hooded Warbler, Summer Tanager, and 13 Northern Waterthrush and 23 Swamp Sparrows (it was damp).

Fall 1994

  • 15 August to 28 October (61 days)
  • 1082 new birds, 229 recaptures, 57.3 birds/100 net-hours
  • 73 species
  • Highlights: American Woodcock, three Sharp-shinned Hawks, four Carolina Wrens, Blue-winged Warbler, Northern Parula (rare in fall), Indigo Bunting

Spring 1994

  • 14 April to 31 May (30 days)
  • 232 new birds, 46 recaptures, 24.7 birds/100 net-hours
  • 47 species
  • Highlights: “Brewster’s” Warbler, 79 Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warblers

Fall 1993

  • 4 August to 3 November (59 days)
  • 999 new birds, 385 recaptures, 48.1 birds/100 net-hours
  • 74 species
  • Highlights: “Brewster’s” Warbler, “Lawrence’s” Warbler, Clay-colored Sparrow

Spring 1993

  • 15 April to 4 June (34 days)
  • 575 new birds, 133 recaptures, 21.3 birds/100 net-hours
  • 63 species
  • Highlight: Michigan’s first state record Virginia’s Warbler (13 May)

Fall 1992

  • 12 August to 6 November (36 days)
  • 948 new birds, 164 recaptures, 50.4 birds/100 net-hours
  • 65 species
  • Highlights: Black-billed Cuckoo (22 Sep), Golden-winged Warbler (2 Sep), two White-eyed Vireos (27 Aug and 18 Sep)

Please note:  All data is provisional and not to be cited without written permission.

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